Broadchurch

On the Jurassic coast of Britain lies a charming, tight-knit little town called Broadchurch. But in the opening scenes of the BBC’s series of the same name, we learn that this town is not as blissful as one might think. After a visually gripping sequence of what appears to be a young boy committing a midnight suicide, the town of Broadchurch is re-introduced as an endearing, everyone-knows-everyone kind of community.

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Gushing on Gone Girl

In light of the hype surrounding the David Fincher-directed film adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s thriller novel Gone Girl, I went and saw it for myself . My hopes were up and I was excited despite the fact that I hadn’t seen a single preview. At the same time, I lacked knowledge as to the plot, beside the fact that I knew it was labeled “jarring.” Well, I found it to be pretty darn jarring. SPOILER ALERT now, just in case you haven’t seen this movie and ever want to take the plunge. For those of you who would like to read the gut reactions that Elizabeth Ann Fogal had to Gone Girl, keep reading.

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Inherent Vice: An Invitation

Christmas break is prime movie watching time. No classes, plenty of new releases, and hopefully some Christmas money to spend at the theatre, right? Over break, perhaps you saw a non-Covenant rendition of Into the Woods, the new, modern Annie, or The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies. Or maybe you hit one of the smaller theatres in your area to see a limited-release film called Inherent Vice. But I’m guessing that you probably didn’t, so instead of giving everything away, I’d like to whet your appetite for a wildly interesting, post-modern narrative that you might not have heard about underneath the hustle and bustle of winter blockbusters.

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In Flux

It’s 8 AM on a Thursday morning, and as the fog starts to burn off the students of the Advanced Painting class shuffle in to Jackson Hall. After hanging up their work, coffee is made and chairs are rearranged to create space for a critique. Along the walls of Jackson, each student has five to eight paintings that they have completed or are working on in class. Though some of the paintings are incomplete, they are still required to be displayed to receive constructive criticism from each other and from their professor. Throughout the critique the class moves through the groups of paintings asking questions, explaining ideas, and listening to Professor Morton’s wisdom and tangents.

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